NAPKIN PLACEMENT AT DINNER TABLE. NAPKIN PLACEMENT AT

NAPKIN PLACEMENT AT DINNER TABLE. RESTAURANT PLACEMAT

Napkin Placement At Dinner Table

NAPKIN PLACEMENT AT DINNER TABLE. RESTAURANT PLACEMAT

Napkin Placement At Dinner Table

napkin placement at dinner table

    dinner table

  • the dining table where dinner is served and eaten

    placement

  • The action of putting someone or something in a particular place or the fact of being placed
  • The action of finding a home, job, or school for someone
  • the spatial property of the way in which something is placed; “the arrangement of the furniture”; “the placement of the chairs”
  • the act of putting something in a certain place
  • The act of holding the ball for a placekick
  • contact established between applicants and prospective employees; “the agency provided placement services”

    napkin

  • diaper: garment consisting of a folded cloth drawn up between the legs and fastened at the waist; worn by infants to catch excrement
  • A napkin, or face towel (also in Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia and South Africa: serviette) is a rectangle of cloth or tissue paper used at the table for wiping the mouth while eating. It is usually small and folded.
  • A square piece of cloth or paper used at a meal to wipe the fingers or lips and to protect garments, or to serve food on
  • A baby’s diaper
  • a small piece of table linen that is used to wipe the mouth and to cover the lap in order to protect clothing

napkin placement at dinner table – 5pc Dining

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5pc Dining Table, Chairs & Bench Set Cappuccino Finish
You will receive a total of 1 dining table, 3 side chairs and 1 bench. Table: 47 1/4″L x 20″D x 35″H Chairs: 17 1/2″W x 20″D x 35″H Bench: 36″L x 12 1/4″W x 19″H Finish: Cappuccino Material: Wood, Leather Like Vinyl 5pc Dining Table, Chairs & Bench Set Cappuccino Finish Table features rectangular top. Chair features ladder back. Chair and bench feature cushioned seats, wrapped in a durable leather-like vinyl. Suitable for contemporary style dining room. This set is stylish, elegant and a perfect timeless design to your dining room. Make this set yours today to beautify the decor of your home. Assemble required.

Gladis Sohappy adds trappings

Gladis Sohappy adds trappings
The Yakama Indian matriarch was deliberate and precise in placing the handcrafted decoration to go on the buckskin horse she would ride in the opening ceremonies of the Alder Creek Rodeo. Several, people looked on as she completed her task, but she alone carefully completed her work.

The beautiful buckskin horse is owned by Chrissy Butler of nearby Mabton, Washington. Her family and the Sohappy family have been friends for generations. She is holding the reins of her horse, while Gladis gets it ready for the opening rodeo ceremonies. Tradition.

Before the rodeo begins: When I go to a baseball game I like to arrive early and watch batting practice, the teams take infield practice, and the crowd arriving. It is part of the experience and part of the fun. So it was with attending the opening day of the Alder Creek Pioneer Rodeo. I arrived early.

It was a treat to watch and listen to the colorful and informative program put on by the Yakama Indians in attendance. I listened with admiration as a young lady sang our national antehm. Then I went up into the stands under the shade of some ponderosa pine, and watched the "getting ready" process of this 100th annual running of the Alder Creek Rodeo.

Before the rodeo began there was a lot of activity. Lots of folks have to do their job to put on an event like this. So I watched. A man drove a farm tractor across the rodeo arena to disc the ground. The martiarch of the Yakama tribe, took care in placing cultural adornments on the buckskin horse she would ride in the opening ceremonies. The rodeo’s president, decked out in early 1900s attire, checked his bowler hat.

But the most fun was watching the many who rode their horses around the arena. Walking their horse and visiting with others. Cantering their horse and turning tight circles. They were young and old, cowboys and cowgirls who would compete, rodeo queens, mounted drill team members, and lots of little cowboys and cowgirls just having fun riding their horses. It was magic and some of my favorite photographs were taken before the rodeo itself even began. These are some of them.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you read the story about my visit to Bickleton 7.7.2007 you will read where I met a pretty young woman at the Carousel Museum in Bickleton, Washington. She told me her dad had gone to college with one of my WSU classmates from Bickleton, Mike Clark. She pointed out the church in Bickleton where I would find Mike.

Now roll forward to the 100th Annual Alder Creek Pioneer Rodeo in Cleveland, Washington (four miles south of Bickleton). In a chance meeting at the rodeo, I was talking to two of the Yakama Indians participating in the rodeo events. A young man (David Clinton) walked up and joined us in the conversation.

During the conversation, I learned that it was his wife (Kim) who had helped me at the Carousel museum in Bickleton in 2007. He discovered it was me, who had written the “blog” about that visit. And to add to the story it turns out that David and Kim’s pretty 17 year old daughter had been chosen as the rodeo queen for this the 100th anniversary year of the rodeo. Small world. I might add that not only was Queen Katelynn a lovely young lady, but she could really ride a horse.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The 100th running of the Alder Creek Rodeo in Cleveland, Washington.

Friday night (June 11th, 2010) I had visited the rodeo grounds in Cleveland, Washington with my wife. We met two of our long time friends there as well. We took a few free rides on the 1905 (also listed as 1902 or 1907) Herschell-Spillman “wooden horses” carousel. Later we drove north from Cleveland the four miles to Bickleton, where the four of us had a nice and fun dinner at the oldest tavern in Washington state, opened in 1882…the Bluebird.

Saturday (June 12th, 2010). I took my camera and ice chest and drove back to Cleveland to spend the day. The day opened with talks by Yakama Indians in native attire. Several of them entertained a large audience telling stories of their dances, traditions, costumes and ties to the area and the Alder Creek Rodeo.

I found it fun sitting up at the top of one of the grandstands under the shade of some huge ponderosa pine trees, watching the preparations for the official start of the 100 year anniversary running of the Alder Creek Rodeo.

The rodeo itself was full of excitement, fun, humor, skill, and wonderful horsemanship by men, women and kids. My favorite event of the entire rodeo was the women’s barrel racing. A range cow milking event with teams of three men trying to “capture” and get milk from unruly, indignant and strong range cows, provided the most laughs.

There were plenty of American flags on display and during the opening ceremonies of this small town rodeo,and there was a touching tribute to our country, our flag, and the men and women in uniform serving our country. It was well done.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A trip to Bickleton 07.07.2007

When I went to Washingto

Pitchin' in

Pitchin' in
I had to have this photograph. As a young man in Kansas, I spent lots of time on a farm driving a Ford farm tractor pulling a circular windrow or plowing the deep rich dark soil of the Verdigris River.

It takes so many people and most if not all our doing their work as volunteers, to make a rodeo like this a success, and it was! All those that helped with the rodeo wore red shirts. It was a tribute to Bickleton and Cleveland to see so many willing to "pitch in" to provide fun and memories for many (including me).

Before the rodeo begins: When I go to a baseball game I like to arrive early and watch batting practice, the teams take infield practice, and the crowd arriving. It is part of the experience and part of the fun. So it was with attending the opening day of the Alder Creek Pioneer Rodeo. I arrived early.

It was a treat to watch and listen to the colorful and informative program put on by the Yakama Indians in attendance. I listened with admiration as a young lady sang our national antehm. Then I went up into the stands under the shade of some ponderosa pine, and watched the "getting ready" process of this 100th annual running of the Alder Creek Rodeo.

Before the rodeo began there was a lot of activity. Lots of folks have to do their job to put on an event like this. So I watched. A man drove a farm tractor across the rodeo arena to disc the ground. The martiarch of the Yakama tribe, took care in placing cultural adornments on the buckskin horse she would ride in the opening ceremonies. The rodeo’s president, decked out in early 1900s attire, checked his bowler hat.

But the most fun was watching the many who rode their horses around the arena. Walking their horse and visiting with others. Cantering their horse and turning tight circles. They were young and old, cowboys and cowgirls who would compete, rodeo queens, mounted drill team members, and lots of little cowboys and cowgirls just having fun riding their horses. It was magic and some of my favorite photographs were taken before the rodeo itself even began. These are some of them.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you read the story about my visit to Bickleton 7.7.2007 you will read where I met a pretty young woman at the Carousel Museum in Bickleton, Washington. She told me her dad had gone to college with one of my WSU classmates from Bickleton, Mike Clark. She pointed out the church in Bickleton where I would find Mike.

Now roll forward to the 100th Annual Alder Creek Pioneer Rodeo in Cleveland, Washington (four miles south of Bickleton). In a chance meeting at the rodeo, I was talking to two of the Yakama Indians participating in the rodeo events. A young man (David Clinton) walked up and joined us in the conversation.

During the conversation, I learned that it was his wife (Kim) who had helped me at the Carousel museum in Bickleton in 2007. He discovered it was me, who had written the “blog” about that visit. And to add to the story it turns out that David and Kim’s pretty 17 year old daughter had been chosen as the rodeo queen for this the 100th anniversary year of the rodeo. Small world. I might add that not only was Queen Katelynn a lovely young lady, but she could really ride a horse.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The 100th running of the Alder Creek Rodeo in Cleveland, Washington.

Friday night (June 11th, 2010) I had visited the rodeo grounds in Cleveland, Washington with my wife. We met two of our long time friends there as well. We took a few free rides on the 1905 (also listed as 1902 or 1907) Herschell-Spillman “wooden horses” carousel. Later we drove north from Cleveland the four miles to Bickleton, where the four of us had a nice and fun dinner at the oldest tavern in Washington state, opened in 1882…the Bluebird.

Saturday (June 12th, 2010). I took my camera and ice chest and drove back to Cleveland to spend the day. The day opened with talks by Yakama Indians in native attire. Several of them entertained a large audience telling stories of their dances, traditions, costumes and ties to the area and the Alder Creek Rodeo.

I found it fun sitting up at the top of one of the grandstands under the shade of some huge ponderosa pine trees, watching the preparations for the official start of the 100 year anniversary running of the Alder Creek Rodeo.

The rodeo itself was full of excitement, fun, humor, skill, and wonderful horsemanship by men, women and kids. My favorite event of the entire rodeo was the women’s barrel racing. A range cow milking event with teams of three men trying to “capture” and get milk from unruly, indignant and strong range cows, provided the most laughs.

There were plenty of American flags on display and during the opening ceremonies of this small town rodeo,and there was a touching tribute to our country, our flag, and the men and women in uniform serving our country. It was well done.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A trip to Bickleton 07.07.2007

When I went to Washington State University I

napkin placement at dinner table

napkin placement at dinner table

Table-Mate II Folding Table
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